Too much sitting gives us eight years to live


January 19, 2022– The author: weekly

Too much sitting gives us eight years to live

Among women who did not exercise but sat for ten hours or more, shorter telomeres were found than in respondents who were inactive but sat for less time during the day. It turned out that the bodies of women who had been sitting for a long time and were inactive were on average eight years older.

Too much sitting makes our body age faster and gives us eight years more life than the actual number, scientists say, but they add that exercise can reverse the negative effects, according to the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Sitting for several hours during the day is associated with many illnesses, diseases that lead to heart problems and diabetes, and even premature death. It is not difficult to understand why: inactivity affects weight, and obesity is a risk factor for heart attack and stroke, hypertension and high blood sugar levels.

Sitting has a detrimental effect on our biological body. at the cellular level. A new study from the University of California, San Diego, investigated the effect of laying on chromosomes. A team of researchers analyzed the blood of 1,500 elderly women during a long study, a measure of changes in telomere length (which protects the chromosome from degradation). Previous studies have shown that as cells divide and age, they lose parts of telomeres, so the length of the telomere may be an indicator of how old a cell is, ie. how old is the person. Researchers compared the length of telomeres to the amount of women exercised to see how physical activity affects the elderly. Previous studies have also looked at the length and activity of telomeres, but rely on people’s statements about how much they exercise, which is often an arbitrary impression. Now the study relies more on the concrete measurement of their daily activities (with a device that was attached to them for a week). Initially, no link was found between telomere length and physical activity levels, but when they focused on women who did not exercise daily for the recommended half-hour at moderate to high intensity, the researchers found found a link. Among women who did not exercise but sat for ten hours or more, shorter telomeres were found than in respondents who were inactive but sat for less time during the day. It turned out that the bodies of women who sat for a long time and were inactive were on average eight years older, which was not the case with women who were inactive, but also spent less time sitting down every day.

“Our results show that the combination of sitting and inactivity leads to a shorter telomere shortening,” says study leader Aladdin Shadija. “Women who are not physically active and feel for ten hours a day are biologically older, and their cells age faster than women who spend less time sitting down.

Exactly how much physical activity is needed to predict the effect of sitting has not been fully determined, but the study looked at half an hour of daily exercise, which is enough to get you started.

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